Posts tagged "asian american"
“In crunching the numbers,” Lee said, “[researchers] found on an aggregate level, Latino men have to make something like $70,000 more than a comparable white man for a white women to be open to dating them.” With African American men, that figure shoots up to $120,000, and for Asian men, it’s even higher: $250,000. PolicyMic’s Justin Chan argued that the cards are thus stacked against Asian men, too often considered “undateable.”“A 2007 study conducted by researchers at Columbia University, which surveyed a group of over 400 students who participated orchestrated ‘speed dating’ sessions, showed that African American and white women said ‘yes’ 65% less often to the prospect of dating Asian men in comparison to men of their own race, while Hispanic women said yes 50% less frequently,” Chan explained.Surveys from PolicyMic and OKCupid support Chan’s assertion that racism is alive and well in the dating world; this can have particularly harmful consequences for the ethnic and racial minorities who face these daily prejudices. This isn’t just about preferences, Marc Ambinder writes in an article for the Week. “This is real racism, blatant and banal, casual and even comfortable,” he argues. Ambinder called dating “the last racial taboo,” and it won’t be solved just by communicating with mates of other ethnicities and backgrounds. As the Guardian’s Bim Adewunmi showed, online dating can be an outlet for racism itself. “More than one person has asked me if it’s true ‘what they say about black girls,’ ” Adewumni wrote. “Several have asked me: ‘So where do you really come from?’ “Clearly we have a lot of issues to work out, and we can address them by starting a conversation on race rather than just dumping our prejudices onto other people. And we should be grateful for people like Lorde, who openly challenge how we look at dating by being unapologetic about who they love. For Asian men like James Lowe, it’s a necessary reminder that they exist too.http://www.latimes.com/opinion/opinion-la/la-ol-lorde-asian-boyfriend-racist-comments-20131211,0,5546151.story#ixzz2nEqJ4trs



“In crunching the numbers,” Lee said, “[researchers] found on an aggregate level, Latino men have to make something like $70,000 more than a comparable white man for a white women to be open to dating them.” With African American men, that figure shoots up to $120,000, and for Asian men, it’s even higher: $250,000.
 

PolicyMic’s Justin Chan argued that the cards are thus stacked against Asian men, too often considered “undateable.”

“A 2007 study conducted by researchers at Columbia University, which surveyed a group of over 400 students who participated orchestrated ‘speed dating’ sessions, showed that African American and white women said ‘yes’ 65% less often to the prospect of dating Asian men in comparison to men of their own race, while Hispanic women said yes 50% less frequently,” Chan explained.

Surveys from PolicyMic and OKCupid support Chan’s assertion that racism is alive and well in the dating world; this can have particularly harmful consequences for the ethnic and racial minorities who face these daily prejudices. This isn’t just about preferences, Marc Ambinder writes in an article for the Week. “This is real racism, blatant and banal, casual and even comfortable,” he argues.

Ambinder called dating “the last racial taboo,” and it won’t be solved just by communicating with mates of other ethnicities and backgrounds. As the Guardian’s Bim Adewunmi showed, online dating can be an outlet for racism itself. “More than one person has asked me if it’s true ‘what they say about black girls,’ ” Adewumni wrote. “Several have asked me: ‘So where do you really come from?’ “

Clearly we have a lot of issues to work out, and we can address them by starting a conversation on race rather than just dumping our prejudices onto other people. And we should be grateful for people like Lorde, who openly challenge how we look at dating by being unapologetic about who they love. For Asian men like James Lowe, it’s a necessary reminder that they exist too.

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/opinion-la/la-ol-lorde-asian-boyfriend-racist-comments-20131211,0,5546151.story#ixzz2nEqJ4trs

"White women said yes about 30 percent less often to black or Hispanic men, and about 65 percent less often to Asian men…

For equal success with a white woman, an African-American needs to earn an additional $154,000; a Hispanic man needs $77,000; an Asian needs $247,000…

For equal success with an Asian woman, an African-American needs no additional income; a white man needs $24,000 less than average; a Hispanic man needs $28,000 more than average.”

all men are thieves movie

All Men are Thieves is a stylish modern-day film noir set in the heart of San Francisco. The film is a twist on the buddy cop genre, following the relationship of two career criminals who first learn to work together and then become brothers. Vincent, a cautious loner who is conflicted by his family responsibilities finally finds a kindred spirit in Rich, a fast talking smooth criminal with a secret of his own that threatens to destroy their friendship and test to see if blood is thicker than water.

In a world where all men are thieves, family and brotherhood are the only things you can count on.

Watch the film that started it all: https://vimeo.com/70535263

no rest photos
Sample limited-edition printed photos (No Rest for the Wicked, 2009)

Short Summary

Hi my name is Henry J. Kim, and I am a Bay-Area based filmmaker who has been making films since I was 13 years old. When I was a little kid I originally wanted to be a comic book artist “when I grew up.” But my passion for film started one fateful day when my father, who was an architect/general contractor, brought home over 500 VHS tapes from a Video Store client who couldn’t pay him. Over the course of several months, I watched movies every day when I came home, and somewhere along the way I decided that this was better for me, that in the end all I wanted to do was tell stories and move people through the art of filmmaking.

Like any true filmmaker I love all genres but currently have been focused on the crime/noir genre in the past few years.

I was particularly affected early on by the film El Mariachi, Robert Rodriguez, and his book Rebel Without a Film Crew, which espoused the values of being totally independent and using your creativity to solve problems in being able to tell effective stories on tiny budgets. In short he inspired me to go out and just do it, and as a result I have taken those guerilla values and applied them into my films.

I have learned a lot from my past two projects, No Rest for the Wicked & At Dawn They Sleep. Each time we pushed ourselves to the limits of sensibility. In No Rest for the Wicked, I did everything that filmschool teaches you NOT to do.. I had a lot of locations, action, car chases, and all sorts of nuttiness. We dared to make a film without considering our limits and came away with a project of extremely high production value that we are very proud of. With At Dawn, we also took that to a new level, also including action against green screen and an even bigger cast and more complex action. But also I was more proud of At Dawn because of the drama and character development we managed to achieve.

Now, this brings us to All Men are Thieves, a new film project that I am personally extremely excited for because it represents what I believe to be the best of all that I’ve learn thus far. This is the film I was meant to make, and it’s going to be the best I’ve ever made, I’m sure of it. Then again, if I didn’t believe that from the beginning, why try in the first place, right?


Our goal is to make the best short crime/drama film yet made in San Francisco. We have everything lined up, the script is ready, the actors are all working for free and now we just need your help!

What We Need & What You Get

We are looking for at least $7,000 in funding, which will be just enough to cover the basic production costs for making the 15 page script I’ve written come to life.

I can assure you that one of my greatest strengths is the ability to stretch pennies on the dollar, and every penny donated will go far in helping to create an extremely high production value that can match those of Hollywood and beyond!

We are actually not asking for a lot considering the quality we are achieving, and every penny will go simply towards these basic but essential costs:

1. Equipment: Camera, lighting, grip, etc.
2. Locations: Applicable Fees, permits, costs to accomodate.
3. Visual Production Quality: Wardrobe, Set Design, Construction, Props, etc.
4. Meals, Transportation, Lodging: Essential cost for feeding the cast/crew, getting them around, and also making sure they don’t sleep on the streets. (Very rude when they are working for free already)

Please see my previous work to really get an idea on the quality of filmmaking we are going for here, I am proud to say that this will not just be some mindless action film with kids running around pointing guns at each other, I am attempting to make a film that will be a stylistic prelude & direct tie-in for the feature film “The Once and Future King.” -A feature film in development about family and sacrifice set within a sprawling crime world that spans from San Franisco to Los Angeles.

STRECH GOALS:
The first tier of $7,000 will tell a good solid short story about 10-15 minutes in length.

For our stretch goals

$15,000 -AN EXPANDED 30 MINUTE MOVIE (a deeper story with more backstory)
$30,000 -AN EXPANDED 45 MINUTE MOVIE (includes a new plot twist!)
$50,000 -A FULL FEATURE FILM (The Once and Future King)

I have all versions of the script written already, and The Once and Future King was finished earlier this year with the intention of filming in 2014, but if we achieve our ultimate stretch goal early, we’ll be able to get started right away!

The Impact

We believe this project is worthy of supporting for two reasons: 1.) There hasn’t been any memorable crime dramas set in San Francisco. 2.) Our track record. If you see our past films and compare their budgets to the quality achieved, you can be rest assured that your money will be well used!

Other Ways You Can Help

Some people just can’t contribute, but that doesn’t mean they can’t help:

  • Ask folks to get the word out and make some noise about your campaign.
  • Remind them to use the Indiegogo share tools!

And that’s all there is to it.

Viktor NL Introducing the talented designers that I’ll be working closely with from now until October to bring 7 brand new collections to the runway of Viet Fashion Week! Vicki Nguyen, Calvin Hiep, Jacky Tài, Sachika Twins, Thai Nguyen (represented by Andrew Philip Nguyen), and Cynthia Bui! Peter Phan was so fashionably late I need to figure out how to fit him in this photo. ;p

Viktor NL
Introducing the talented designers that I’ll be working closely with from now until October to bring 7 brand new collections to the runway of Viet Fashion Week! Vicki Nguyen, Calvin Hiep, Jacky Tài, Sachika Twins, Thai Nguyen (represented by Andrew Philip Nguyen), and Cynthia Bui! Peter Phan was so fashionably late I need to figure out how to fit him in this photo. ;p

pretaportre:

“Celebrating its 36th anniversary, the October issue of Harper’s Bazaar China travels to Paris for a story featuring classic style. In front of Yin Chao’s lens, Miao Bin Si showcases retro style in luxe designs from the likes of Lanvin, Mugler, Dior Haute Couture and Elie Saab styled by Fan Xiaomu and Gugu as she explores Paris with special guest Didier Grumbach. Super glam hair and makeup by Bon and Wang Qian perfect the sophisticated ensembles.”

(via FGR)

saigon vs hanoi in pictures

David Tran’s company, Huy Fong Foods Inc., is moving to a $40-million, 655,000-square-foot facility in Irwindale that could triple its production capacity. (Gina Ferazzi, Los Angeles Times / March 25, 2013)
By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
April 12, 2013, 11:56 p.m.



The gig: David Tran, 68, founded hot sauce company Huy Fong Foods Inc. in Chinatown in 1980 and a few years later introduced Sriracha sauce to the U.S.

His Sriracha, a version of a hot sauce originating in Si Racha, Thailand, quickly spread through the San Gabriel Valley and eventually the nation. The fiery red concoction in the clear bottle with the distinctive green cap and rooster logo has since gone mainstream: Google “Sriracha” and you’ll find such things as cookbooks, water bottles, iPhone cases and T-shirts.
Huy Fong Foods, which is still privately owned, sold more than $60 million worth of sauce last year, office manager Donna Lam said.
Refugee: When North Vietnam’s communists took power in South Vietnam, Tran, a major in the South Vietnamese army, fled with his family to the U.S. After settling in Los Angeles, Tran couldn’t find a job — or a hot sauce to his liking.
So he made his own by hand in a bucket, bottled it and drove it to customers in a van. He named his company Huy Fong Foods after the Taiwanese freighter that carried him out of Vietnam.
Packing heat: Early on, one of Tran’s packaging suppliers told him, “Your product is too spicy. How can you sell it?” Add a tomato base, some friends counseled. Sweeten the flavor to pair it better with chicken, others said. But Tran stood firm.
"Hot sauce must be hot. If you don’t like it hot, use less," he said. "We don’t make mayonnaise here."
Pricing it right: Tran had just one guiding business principle: “Make a rich man’s sauce at a poor man’s price.” In more than two decades of operation, Tran has kept the wholesale price of his sauce constant, but he would not disclose it. A 28-ounce bottle goes for about $4, depending on the retailer.
"My American dream was never to become a billionaire," Tran said. "We started this because we like fresh, spicy chili sauce."
That means cranking up the chili content of each bottle and making sure each pepper is as hot as possible, Tran said. As the company grew, Huy Fong Foods developed a relationship with a supplier in Ventura County and carefully monitored the entire growing process from seed to harvest.
Now, each chili is processed within a day of harvesting to ensure peak spiciness.
Production strained: In 2007, the company oversold its sauces and ran out of the peppers with three months left in the year. Stores marked up their prices and many started to hoard the sauce, Lam said.
Under immense pressure from customers, Tran considered his possibilities. He could buy supermarket jalapenos, but that left no way to predict the heat of the sauce. Brined peppers were also out of the question — who knew how those had been grown?
So, Huy Fong Foods went to each of its customers and asked them to wait — and they did. “We didn’t lose any customers,” Lam said.
Now the company sets a monthly production quota for each sauce. Every bottle of sauce produced already has been sold, Lam said.
Competition: The popularity of Huy Fong Foods’ Sriracha sauce has spurred many copycats and competitors. Because the sauce is named for the Thai city, the company cannot trademark the name.
Roland Foods in New York makes its own variety, Sriracha Chili Sauce, in a similarly shaped yellow-capped bottle featuring two dragons instead of a rooster. Frito-Lay is testing a Sriracha-flavored potato chip, and Subway is experimenting with a creamy Sriracha sauce for sandwiches.
But Tran said he’s not bothered by the fact that others are trying to capitalize on the market his sauce created.
"We just do our own thing and try to keep the price low," Tran said.
Revenue grows about 20% a year even with all the competition. Huy Fong Foods has never spent a dollar on advertising.
Family business: Tran has no interest in branching out beyond making Sriracha and two other hot sauces, Chili Garlic and Sambal Oelek. All the Sriracha-branded products online are made by others. He spends hours Googling “Sriracha” and chuckling over fans’ creations.
He’s turned down multiple lucrative offers to sell his company, fearing his vision would be compromised.
"This company, she is like a loved one to me, like family. Why would I share my loved one with someone else?" Tran said.
He intends to keep it a family business: His son is the president, and his daughter is vice president.
He has repeatedly rejected pleas to sell stock in the company and turned down financiers who offer him money to increase production significantly.
"If our product is still welcomed by the customer, then we will keep growing," Tran said.
New quarters: Huy Fong Foods has operated out of two buildings in Rosemead since the late 1980s, but it’s moving to a $40-million, 655,000-square-foot factory and headquarters in Irwindale that could triple its production capacity. The company expects to complete the transition by June.
"Who knows where the company will go? We just always try to make the best sauce possible," Tran said.
Getting personal: Tran and his wife, Ada, live in Arcadia. They have two children.
frank.shyong@latimes.com



http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-himi-tran-20130414,0,835689.story

David Tran’s company, Huy Fong Foods Inc., is moving to a $40-million, 655,000-square-foot facility in Irwindale that could triple its production capacity. (Gina Ferazzi, Los Angeles Times / March 25, 2013)

The gig: David Tran, 68, founded hot sauce company Huy Fong Foods Inc. in Chinatown in 1980 and a few years later introduced Sriracha sauce to the U.S.

His Sriracha, a version of a hot sauce originating in Si Racha, Thailand, quickly spread through the San Gabriel Valley and eventually the nation. The fiery red concoction in the clear bottle with the distinctive green cap and rooster logo has since gone mainstream: Google “Sriracha” and you’ll find such things as cookbooks, water bottles, iPhone cases and T-shirts.

Huy Fong Foods, which is still privately owned, sold more than $60 million worth of sauce last year, office manager Donna Lam said.

Refugee: When North Vietnam’s communists took power in South Vietnam, Tran, a major in the South Vietnamese army, fled with his family to the U.S. After settling in Los Angeles, Tran couldn’t find a job — or a hot sauce to his liking.

So he made his own by hand in a bucket, bottled it and drove it to customers in a van. He named his company Huy Fong Foods after the Taiwanese freighter that carried him out of Vietnam.

Packing heat: Early on, one of Tran’s packaging suppliers told him, “Your product is too spicy. How can you sell it?” Add a tomato base, some friends counseled. Sweeten the flavor to pair it better with chicken, others said. But Tran stood firm.

"Hot sauce must be hot. If you don’t like it hot, use less," he said. "We don’t make mayonnaise here."

Pricing it right: Tran had just one guiding business principle: “Make a rich man’s sauce at a poor man’s price.” In more than two decades of operation, Tran has kept the wholesale price of his sauce constant, but he would not disclose it. A 28-ounce bottle goes for about $4, depending on the retailer.

"My American dream was never to become a billionaire," Tran said. "We started this because we like fresh, spicy chili sauce."

That means cranking up the chili content of each bottle and making sure each pepper is as hot as possible, Tran said. As the company grew, Huy Fong Foods developed a relationship with a supplier in Ventura County and carefully monitored the entire growing process from seed to harvest.

Now, each chili is processed within a day of harvesting to ensure peak spiciness.

Production strained: In 2007, the company oversold its sauces and ran out of the peppers with three months left in the year. Stores marked up their prices and many started to hoard the sauce, Lam said.

Under immense pressure from customers, Tran considered his possibilities. He could buy supermarket jalapenos, but that left no way to predict the heat of the sauce. Brined peppers were also out of the question — who knew how those had been grown?

So, Huy Fong Foods went to each of its customers and asked them to wait — and they did. “We didn’t lose any customers,” Lam said.

Now the company sets a monthly production quota for each sauce. Every bottle of sauce produced already has been sold, Lam said.

Competition: The popularity of Huy Fong Foods’ Sriracha sauce has spurred many copycats and competitors. Because the sauce is named for the Thai city, the company cannot trademark the name.

Roland Foods in New York makes its own variety, Sriracha Chili Sauce, in a similarly shaped yellow-capped bottle featuring two dragons instead of a rooster. Frito-Lay is testing a Sriracha-flavored potato chip, and Subway is experimenting with a creamy Sriracha sauce for sandwiches.

But Tran said he’s not bothered by the fact that others are trying to capitalize on the market his sauce created.

"We just do our own thing and try to keep the price low," Tran said.

Revenue grows about 20% a year even with all the competition. Huy Fong Foods has never spent a dollar on advertising.

Family business: Tran has no interest in branching out beyond making Sriracha and two other hot sauces, Chili Garlic and Sambal Oelek. All the Sriracha-branded products online are made by others. He spends hours Googling “Sriracha” and chuckling over fans’ creations.

He’s turned down multiple lucrative offers to sell his company, fearing his vision would be compromised.

"This company, she is like a loved one to me, like family. Why would I share my loved one with someone else?" Tran said.

He intends to keep it a family business: His son is the president, and his daughter is vice president.

He has repeatedly rejected pleas to sell stock in the company and turned down financiers who offer him money to increase production significantly.

"If our product is still welcomed by the customer, then we will keep growing," Tran said.

New quarters: Huy Fong Foods has operated out of two buildings in Rosemead since the late 1980s, but it’s moving to a $40-million, 655,000-square-foot factory and headquarters in Irwindale that could triple its production capacity. The company expects to complete the transition by June.

"Who knows where the company will go? We just always try to make the best sauce possible," Tran said.

Getting personal: Tran and his wife, Ada, live in Arcadia. They have two children.

frank.shyong@latimes.com

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-himi-tran-20130414,0,835689.story

Cesar Cipriano About Tokyo Drift… Lin wanted Sung Kang in the lead. But execs refused to have an Asian in the lead. So that was one of MANY compromises he had to make. Bow bow’s role was supposed to be Asian as well (I remember auditioning for it). Think about it, kid gets bullied, gets in trouble, and is forced to move in with his down and out father in JAPAN. Why is a down and our white guy living in the most expensive country in Asia??? Hollywood.
Asian: I’m Asian, of course all I care about is money.

Just downloaded

Erin Li's short HERE: http://erinli.com/limited-time-offer-free-download-of-to-the-bone-2/     I don’t get why more filmmakers don’t make their films avail. I would have gladly paid $5, even better if free because free promotion. PROPS TO ERIN.

 

Sundance film to boot!

Did you want to see TO THE BONE but couldn’t make it out to Slamdance Film Festival in Park City this year? Now is your chance! For a limited time, you can obtain a free download of the film.

What people are saying about TO THE BONE:

“With staunch, dedicated performances from everyone in this small cast and beautifully-shot scenes that tell much more than eight minutes worth of a story, To The Bone is definitely not a film to miss.” – Slug Magazine

Beautifully craftedan exquisitely-executed, tragic tale of the sacrifices that such families endure in order to survive.” – The What It Do (Sundance Film Festival 2013 Recap: Directors to Watch)

Neaato Org
Eddie huangs fresh off the.boat audio cd..gonna.listen now.


Eddie huangs fresh off the.boat audio cd..gonna.listen now.

jeremy lin makes it to linsanity the movie at sundance in salt lakey

Johnny tri nguyen aka viet robert dinero


Johnny tri nguyen aka viet robert dinero

network of entertaining asian american talent org

twitter.com/neaato

view archive



Facebook US!

twitter us!

older blog

asian american film stuff

asian american actors

asian american funny

asian american documentaries

high expectations asian father

Ask me anything